God is our Guide  Number 1 site for helping reverse diseases on Planet Earth

 

CIDPUSA.ORG

 
Home
Diagnosis
Treatment
Pathology
Variants
CIDP info
Fibromyalgia
IVIG
Anti-inflammatory Diet
Burning  Feet Home
Services Page
Chronic Fatigue
Autoimmune diseases
Prognosis
Bible healing
Celiac disease
Miracle ITP

Hemolytic anemia

Cholesterol drugs & Bleeding

Iron low anemia

Celiac anemia

Pernicious anemia

B-12 anemia

Peripheral Neuropathy

Noise in artery

Urine

Buddhism

 

 Anemia Diseases  treatment CIDPUSA Foundation

   alternatives treatment of autoimmune disease read our e-book 

Special Google Health Search.

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a group of disorders characterized by a malfunction of the immune system that produces autoantibodies, which attack red blood cells as if they were substances foreign to the body.

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an uncommon group of disorders that can occur at any age. These disorders affect women more often than men. About half of the time, the cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cannot be determined (idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia). Autoimmune hemolytic anemia can also be caused by or occur with another disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and  it can follows the use of certain drugs, such as penicillin.

Destruction of red blood cells by autoantibodies may occur suddenly, or it may develop gradually. In some people, the destruction may stop after a period of time; whereas in other people, it persists and becomes chronic. There are two main types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia: warm antibody hemolytic anemia and cold antibody hemolytic anemia. In the warm antibody type, the autoantibodies attach to and destroy red blood cells at temperatures equal to or in excess of normal body temperature. In the cold antibody type, the autoantibodies become most active and attack red blood cells only at temperatures well below normal body temperature.

Symptoms

Some people with autoimmune hemolytic anemia may have no symptoms, especially when the destruction of red blood cells is mild and develops gradually. Others have symptoms similar to those that occur with other types of anemia, especially when the destruction is more severe or rapid. When severe or rapid destruction of red blood cells occurs, mild jaundice may also develop. When destruction persists for a few months or longer, the spleen may enlarge, resulting in a sense of abdominal fullness and, occasionally, discomfort.

When the cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia is another disease, symptoms of the underlying disease, such as swollen and tender lymph nodes and fever, may dominate.