God is our Guide  Number 1 site for helping reverse diseases on Planet Earth
 

CidpUSA.org

 
Home
Diagnosis
Treatment
Pathology
Variants
Natural makeup
Diet
IVIG
Celiac Disease Guide
Celiac Disease Info
Celiac D Anatomy
Celiac D Story
Celiac Neurology
Celiac Mystery
Celiac Secrets
Autoimmune diseases

Homocysteine diet

 Scleroderma

Rheumatic diseases

Rheumatoid arthritis

Garlic for Gout

Antibiotics for help

Causes of Burning feet
Osteoporosis & Celiac
Neck Pain
Ocular Female diseases
Chronic fatigue syndrome
Osteoporosis avoid
Women Heart Attacks
Breast Size & Disease
Female Sex Disease
Breast Medical Massage
Memory problems
Fibromyalgia Myth
Kidney stone Buster
Bras cause breast cancer
Skin repair Clinic
Pandas
Hepatitis

Neuropathy testing

Statin neuropathy

CIDP in animals

Weakness

Electronic stimulation

Pulsed magnetic field treatment

Multiple Sclerosis treatment

Morgellons story

 Mammogram

   Mold

   Lupus 

   Selinium

  SLE & GENES

 Toxic Baby Car Seats

 More Spices

 Polymyalgia

Autoimmune self attack

 

 

 Rheumatic Fever   CIDPUSA Foundation

  alternatives treatment of autoimmune disease read our e-book 

Special GoogleHealth Search
Pine Bark Reduces Osteoarthritis

More than 20 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis, with half a million Americans having a total joint replacement each year. A new study to be published in the April 2008 edition (Volume 22, issue No 4) of the journal of Phytotherapy Research shows Pycnogenol (pic-noj-en-all), an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, was shown to reduce all osteoarthritis symptoms by 56 percent. The study revealed a particularly high efficacy of Pycnogenol for lowering joint pain by 55 percent. Moreover, patients required dramatically less standard pain medication (-58 percent), which greatly improved the gastrointestinal complications resulting from the pain medication by 63 percent.

“Pycnogenol seemed a natural fit for this study,” said Dr. Gianni Belcaro, a lead researcher of the study. “There are a few main components contributing to the clinical picture of treatment management in osteoarthritis: inflammation causing a progression in the disease, alteration of fatigue resistance and muscular performance — reversing and blocking the vascular problems associated to altered mobility. Theoretically, a treatment with a compound specifically active on all those aspects could be highly effective, which is why we chose Pycnogenol.”

The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, held at Italy’s Chieti-Pescara University, sampled 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (OA). Patients were administered 100 mg Pycnogenol or placebo, daily for three months. Symptoms were evaluated by WOMAC index scores and mobility by recording their walking performance on a treadmill. Patients were permitted to continue taking their choice of pain medication provided they recorded every tablet in a diary for later evaluation.

After three months, scores for pain dropped significantly for the Pycnogenol treatment group and no significant effects were recorded for the placebo group. Scores for stiffness were reduced by 53 percent. The scores for physical function were reduced by 57 percent in the Pycnogenol group and improvement under placebo was not significant. The global WOMAC score decreased following Pycnogenol treatment and very little in the placebo group, from 56 percent vs. 9.6 percent for Pycnogenol and placebo, respectively. Overall well-being of patients (emotional function) was significantly enhanced with the Pycnogenol group, by 64 percent and 15 percent for the placebo group.

Results of exercise tests on the treadmill demonstrated an increased performance after three months of Pycnogenol treatment. At the start of the study, patients could only walk a mean of 74 yards without feeling pain and after three months, they could walk 216 yards, compared to the placebo group that noted 71 yards at the beginning of the study and 96 yards at the end.

Patients were allowed to use their regular dosage of NSAIDS. Usage dropped by 58 percent during treatment with Pycnogenol and one percent with the placebo. Evaluation of data demonstrated a decrease of gastrointestinal complications of 64 percent in the Pycnogenol group versus three percent in placebo.

“The results of this study are significant as they clearly demonstrate the clinical action of Pycnogenol on OA and management of symptoms. The use of Pycnogenol many reduce costs and side effects of anti-inflammatory agents and offer a natural alternative solution to people suffering from OA” said Dr. Belcaro.

     want to learn about the brain and spinal cord